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Beyonce Speaks on Anti "Formation" Comments

There's been rumors tossed around that Beyonce's "Formation" video sparked controversy over anti-police opinions. The video, going (incredibly) viral and sweeping the world with it's crazy choreography and enthusiasm, shows Bey and her girl squad taking over their territory. It's been quite some time since Beyonce has really bodied her ideas of feminism, making this video unsurprising to those who know her.



But, of course, there will always be people talking. Beyonce isn't having it, and made a statement to clarify her stance on the matter.

"I mean, I'm an artist and I think the most powerful art is usually misunderstood. But anyone who perceives my message as anti-police is completely mistaken. I have so much admiration and respect for officers and the families of officers who sacrifice themselves to keep us safe. But let's be clear: I am against police brutality and injustice. Those are two separate things. If celebrating my roots and culture during Black History Month made anyone uncomfortable, those feelings were there long before a video and long before me. I'm proud of what we created and I'm proud to be a part of a conversation that is pushing things forward in a positive way."

She also touched on her enthusiasm of feminist acts --

"I put the definition of feminist in my song [***Flawless] and on my tour, not for propaganda or to proclaim to the world that I'm a feminist, but to give clarity to the true meaning. I'm not really sure people know or understand what a feminist is, but it's very simple. It's someone who believes in equal rights for men and women. I don't understand the negative connotation of the word or why it should exclude the opposite sex. If you're a man who believes your daughter should have the same opportunities and rights as your son, then you're a feminist. We need men and women to understand the double standards that still exist in this world and we need to have a real conversation so we can begin to make changes. Ask anyone, man or woman, 'Do you want your daughter to have 75 cents when she deserves $1?' What do you think the answer should be? When we talk about equal rights, there are issues that face women disproportionately. That's why I wanted to work with [the philanthropic organizations] Chime for Change and Global Citizen. They understand how issues related to education, health, and sanitation around the world affect a woman's entire existence and that of her children. They're putting programs in place to help those young girls who literally face death because they want to learn, and to prevent women from dying during childbirth because there's no access to health care. Working to make those inequalities go away is being a feminist, but more importantly, it makes me a humanist. I don't like or embrace any label. I don't want calling myself a feminist to make it feel like that's my one priority over racism or sexism or anything else. I'm just exhausted by labels and tired of being boxed in. If you believe in equal rights, the same way society allows a man to express his darkness, to express his pain, to express his sexuality, to express his opinion - I feel that women have the same rights."

Written by GrooveVolt

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